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Lie Detector Test Los Angeles, California

LIE DETECTOR TEST LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA

Many defendants, especially those accused of felony crimes or misdemeanor offenses, often ask if they can take a lie detector test as part of their defense. Polygraph tests, also known as lie detector tests, are controversial because experts disagree about their effectiveness. Although the majority of people do not take polygraph tests, there may be circumstances when a person who has been charged with or is under investigation for a crime may want to. If you are thinking about taking a lie detector test, it is important that you talk to an attorney who has experience working with polygraph examiners in the past and knows how best to handle this type of situation.

What is A Lie Detector Test Called?

Lie detectors, or polygraphs, measure and record a person’s heart rate and blood pressure when that person is asked questions. The most commonly used lie detector tests in the United States are polygraphs. The theory behind a lie detector test is that the difference in physiological responses between lying and telling the truth can be measured. Because of this, the term ‘lie detector test’ is actually a misnomer. Instead of judging whether a given statement is true or false, the polygraph determines how nervous you are when making that statement—whether due to guilt or anxiety.

How Does A Lie Detector Test Work?

Studies have shown that when people tell a lie, it affects their mental state—there is some specific change in the physical and mental state of individuals who are lying. It can cause rapid breathing, high blood pressure, and heavy perspiration. Detecting and measuring changes in a person’s physiological responses can identify whether that person is lying. The machine records a pattern of blips when you tell a lie, and it uses that as your signature for future reference.

First of all, a Lie Detector Test (LDT) is administered in a controlled environment with as few distractions or interruptions as possible. It is not administered in a home setting or any other place to make the individual involved feel comfortable and relaxed. There is also a consultation period before you can ask the main questions, during which time you are asked to review important information. During this preparation time, everything possible is done to help you feel relaxed and at ease. Additionally, as a way of getting to know you better and judging how well you answer the main questions, control questions may be asked between those primary queries. The condition of the room remains constant, so that you are able to remain in a state of mind when answering critical questions during the Lie Detector Test.

During the test, the person being tested is connected to the polygraph machine through sensors that measure these physiological responses. The person is then asked a series of questions, both relevant to the issue being tested and control questions that are designed to elicit a similar physiological response. The polygraph operator analyzes the responses to the questions and compares them to determine whether the person is being truthful or deceptive.

It is important to note that polygraph tests are not considered to be completely accurate, and the results are generally not admissible as evidence in a court of law. There is ongoing debate about the reliability of polygraphs and their effectiveness in detecting deception.

Are Lie Detectors Legal in California?

Polygraph tests are generally not admissible as evidence in court in California. This means that the results of a polygraph test cannot be used to prove that someone is telling the truth or lying in a legal case. However, polygraph tests may be used in certain limited circumstances, such as in employment or licensing proceedings, or in plea negotiations in criminal cases.

In California, the use of polygraph tests is regulated by the California Polygraph Examiners Act, which sets forth the requirements that must be met in order for the results of a polygraph test to be considered valid. The Act requires that polygraph examiners be licensed by the state and that they follow certain procedures in administering and interpreting polygraph tests.
It is important to note that polygraph tests are not considered to be completely accurate and may produce false positives or false negatives. As a result, it is generally not advisable to rely on the results of a polygraph test to make important decisions.

How Much is A Lie Detector Test?

The cost of a polygraph test, also known as a lie detector test, in California can vary depending on a number of factors, including the location of the test, the specific purpose of the test, and the experience and reputation of the polygraph examiner. In general, you can expect to pay anywhere from $400 to $800 or more for a polygraph test in California.

It is important to note that polygraph tests are not considered to be completely accurate and may produce false positives or false negatives. As a result, it is generally not advisable to rely on the results of a polygraph test to make important decisions. If you are considering taking a polygraph test, it is a good idea to do your research and shop around to find a reputable polygraph examiner who charges a fair price for their services.

Is The Lie Detector Test 100% Accurate?

Polygraph tests, also known as lie detector tests, are not considered to be completely accurate and may produce false positives or false negatives. While polygraph tests may be able to detect changes in a person’s physiological responses, such as heart rate and blood pressure, that may be associated with lying, these changes can also be caused by other factors, such as stress or anxiety.

The accuracy of a polygraph test can also be influenced by the skill and experience of the polygraph examiner, as well as the specific questions that are asked during the test. Some research has suggested that polygraph tests may be slightly more accurate than chance at detecting deception, but the overall accuracy of polygraph tests is still a matter of debate.

It is important to note that polygraph tests are not considered to be reliable enough to be admissible as evidence in court in many jurisdictions, including California. As a result, it is generally not advisable to rely on the results of a polygraph test to make important decisions.

Many experts disagree on whether the polygraph test is an accurate measure of truthfulness. Some believe that the polygraph test is 90 percent accurate in determining whether someone is lying. However, other studies have found that this number is far lower—and some scientists suggest that the test may be only 60 percent accurate. Some people who are anxious or panicked by the testing process may seem deceptive on a polygraph, when in fact they are telling the truth.

Can You Pass a Polygraph Test Even if You Are Lying?

It is theoretically possible to pass a polygraph test, also known as a lie detector test, even if you are lying, although it is not easy. There are a number of techniques that some people claim can help a person deceive a polygraph test, such as relaxing and maintaining a steady physiological baseline, using countermeasures to interfere with the accuracy of the test, or simply trying to appear confident and self-assured.
However, it is important to note that polygraph tests are not considered to be completely accurate and may produce false positives or false negatives.

The accuracy of a polygraph test can be influenced by a variety of factors, including the skill and experience of the polygraph examiner, the specific questions that are asked during the test, and the individual characteristics of the person being tested.

In general, it is not advisable to rely on the results of a polygraph test to determine whether someone is telling the truth or lying. If you are considering taking a polygraph test, it is a good idea to be honest and not try to deceive the test, as the consequences of being caught in a lie can be severe.

Can An Innocent Person Fail A Lie Detector Test?

Yes, it is possible for an innocent person to fail a lie detector test. There are two reasons why people fail lie detection tests:

  • The person is guilty and is lying about the issue under investigation
  • The person is innocent but reacted similarly to persons known to be guilty, based on scientific research studies.

Polygraph tests, or lie detector tests, are based on the theory that certain physiological responses, such as an increase in heart rate or blood pressure, can be used to determine whether a person is lying. However, these tests are not always accurate and can produce false positives, meaning that they may indicate that a person is lying when they are actually telling the truth. There are a number of factors that can affect the accuracy of a polygraph test, including the questions being asked, the person’s physical and mental state, and the skill of the person administering the test.

Can Someone Pass A Lie Detector Test And Still Be Guilty?

It is possible for someone to pass a lie detector test and still be guilty of a crime. Polygraph tests, or lie detector tests, are not 100% accurate and there is a margin of error. There are also various factors that can affect the accuracy of the test, such as the skill of the polygraph examiner, the questions asked, and the subject’s physical and mental state. Additionally, some people may be able to manipulate the test by using certain techniques to control their physiological responses. For these reasons, polygraph tests are generally not admissible as evidence in court and are not considered to be reliable indicators of guilt or innocence.

How Long Does It Take To Get Lie Detector Test Results?

The length of time it takes to get polygraph test results can vary depending on the circumstances. In some cases, the polygraph examiner may provide the results immediately after the test is completed. In other cases, the examiner may need to review the data collected during the test before providing the results. This review process can take anywhere from a few hours to a few days, depending on the complexity of the test and the amount of data that needs to be analyzed. In general, it is not uncommon for polygraph test results to be available within a few days of the test being administered.

Are Lie Detector Tests Admissible in Court?

If you do agree to a polygraph while under police questioning, you might be worried about the results being admitted as evidence and used against you at trial. Because of the uncertainties surrounding lie detector tests, these results are not usually acceptable as evidence unless both the prosecution and defense agree that they should be admitted. This rule also applies to the opinion of a polygraph examiner and whether or not a defendant refused to take a test when offered or offered to take a test. California law allows the results of a polygraph test to be used in court only under certain circumstances. In this situation the prosecution and defense both agree to allow results that are admissible. “Admitted into evidence” means the results can be shown to a jury or judge.

An agreement must also take place before the following can be admitted into evidence:

  • the opinion of a polygraph examiner,
  • the fact that you offered to take a polygraph test,
  • the fact that you refused or failed a test, and
  • the fact that you took a polygraph test.

The admissibility of a polygraph in court varies from state to state. Some states, such as Arizona, California and Nevada, allow the admission of polygraph evidence in criminal court regardless of whether all parties agreed to its use.
Different states emphasize the accuracy of a test differently. For example, in California attorneys may present the results of a test to the jury and allow them draw their own conclusion based on those findings. Georgia law allows an individual to sue a polygraph examiner for damages if taking the test results in false accusation.
In many states, polygraph evidence is inadmissible regardless of how important it may be. These states include Illinois, New York, Texas, Pennsylvania and the District of Columbia. Federal courts have different rules for admitting polygraph results in legal proceedings. The judge has the authority to decide whether or not admission will be granted.

Why Are Polygraph Tests Not Admissible in Court?

Lie detector tests are not considered reliable by scientists and are therefore inadmissible as evidence, because they can produce flawed results.

The following factors may give you an inaccurate result:

  • Defects or deficiencies with the machine itself or attached equipment;
  • Polygraph examiner bias; and/or
  • Inconsistent responses from the individual being questioned.

The stress of the polygraph exam may cause certain bodily functions (sweating, changes in pulse or blood pressure) that interfere with accurate readings. Nervousness may cause the examiner to respond differently than normal. The courts usually prefer to base their decisions on eyewitness testimony, physical evidence (for example, DNA samples), and confessions that have been made voluntarily—and without coercion from law enforcement.

Can You Be Forced To Take A Lie Detector Test?

There is no law in California or throughout the United States that requires you to take a polygraph test. Therefore, you can never be legally compelled to take such a test. However, if you want a job in the security or law enforcement industries or one that involves handling large sums of cash, sensitive materials or even illegal drugs—for example: a position with Customs and Border Protection Agency (CBP), Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) , Drug Enforcement Administration(DEA ) —passing a polygraph may be a condition of your employment. But in these situations, no one is forcing you to choose a particular option. Because you want to get the job, you are agreeing to do so.

According to the Constitution, police cannot force you to talk about a crime if you are arrested. People sometimes try to talk themselves out of trouble, or explain their situation—but this kind of confession could be used against them in court.

Remember, police officers are trained to convince people that talking with them is in their best interest. This gives the officer an advantage when questioning witnesses or suspects. Because of this, many people are required to take polygraph tests when it isn’t necessarily in their best interests or even legally mandated. Polygraph tests are essentially uncounseled statements to the police because attorneys are not generally present.

This can lead to further problems rather than solve existing ones. You have the right to refuse a polygraph test at any stage of the criminal justice process, no matter what tactics police may use against you. If you ever find yourself in one of those dimly lit rooms, you should politely decline to participate until you’ve discussed the matter with a qualified attorney.

Does Anxiety Affect Lie Detector Tests?

Anxiety can potentially affect the results of a polygraph test, or lie detector test, in California and other states. Polygraph tests work by measuring physiological responses, such as changes in heart rate, blood pressure, and perspiration, that may occur when a person is under stress or lying.

However, anxiety and other strong emotions can also produce these same physiological responses, which can potentially interfere with the accuracy of the test. If a person is excessively anxious or experiencing strong emotions, this could affect the results of the test and make it difficult for the polygraph examiner to accurately interpret the data. It is important for the polygraph examiner to take this into account and adjust the testing procedures as needed in order to minimize the impact of anxiety on the test results.

How Many Questions Are Usually Asked in A Polygraph Test?

The number of questions asked during a polygraph test, or lie detector test, can vary depending on the specific circumstances and the purpose of the test. In general, a polygraph test consists of three types of questions: relevant questions, control questions, and irrelevant questions. Relevant questions are those that pertain to the matter being investigated.

Control questions are designed to elicit a physiological response from the subject and are used as a baseline for comparison with the relevant questions. Irrelevant questions are used to establish a normal physiological response and are not related to the matter being investigated. The exact number of questions asked during a polygraph test can vary widely, but it is not uncommon for a test to include anywhere from 5 to 10 relevant questions and a similar number of control and irrelevant questions. Some of the topics the questionnaire and polygraph may cover include:

  • Personal history
  • Negative information from other agencies (such as previously failing a polygraph)
  • Employment background
  • Criminal behavior
  • Financial information
  • Illegal drug use
  • Alcohol use
  • Illegal or deviant sexual behavior

Can You Cheat A Lie Detector Test?

It is possible for someone to try to deceive a polygraph test, or lie detector test, by using certain techniques, although these methods are generally not reliable and may be detected by the polygraph examiner. One method that has been suggested for attempting to cheat a polygraph test is called “countermeasures.” This involves attempting to interfere with the physiological responses that the polygraph is measuring, such as by biting the tongue, pinching the leg, or making other physical movements that might affect the readings. Another method that has been suggested is called “psyching out,” which involves trying to deceive the polygraph by using mental techniques, such as visualization or self-hypnosis. However, these methods are not generally considered to be reliable and may be detected by the polygraph examiner. In addition, attempting to deceive a polygraph test is generally a crime in itself and can result in criminal charges.

Can You Fail A Lie Detector Test if You Are Nervous?

It is possible for a person to fail a polygraph test, or lie detector test, due to nervousness or other strong emotions. Polygraph tests work by measuring physiological responses, such as changes in heart rate, blood pressure, and perspiration, that may occur when a person is under stress or lying. However, anxiety and other strong emotions can also produce these same physiological responses, which can potentially interfere with the accuracy of the test.

If a person is excessively anxious or experiencing strong emotions, this could affect the results of the test and make it difficult for the polygraph examiner to accurately interpret the data. It is important for the polygraph examiner to take this into account and adjust the testing procedures as needed in order to minimize the impact of anxiety on the test results. It’s important to note that polygraph test results are generally not admissible as evidence in court.

Can An Employer Ask Or Require Me To Take A Polygraph Test?

In California, a private employer cannot make an employee take a lie detector test.
Although an employer cannot legally force you to take a lie detector test, he or she may still require it as part of the hiring process. This is provided that you are:

  • First advised of your rights, and
  • This is done prior to the polygraph test.

If done, and you agree, the employer can perform a test.

Also note that federal law prohibits employers from subjecting you to polygraph tests.

Should I Take A Lie Detector Test If Asked To Do So By The Police?

You should not take a lie detector test without consulting with an attorney who specializes in criminal defense. Because these tests are not foolproof, they can give false positives and negatives. Even though the results of a test are not admissible in court, you may wish to avoid submitting to one if it could result in legal consequences.
A person can “pass” a polygraph test if the examiner concludes that he or she is being truthful in denying committing the crime. However, these test results do not give you the right to introduce them as evidence in court.
The Supreme Court has ruled that you do not:

  • have a constitutional right,
  • to introduce lie detector results into evidence.

The court made this ruling even though the U.S. Constitution says you have a right to present a defense. It’s true that if you take a test and fail, it makes it more likely police will charge you with the crime. Further, this can prejudice prosecutors against you as well—they may be more willing to believe your guilt even when evidence is shaky or contradictory.

Can I Fail A Lie Detector Test Even If I Am Telling The Truth?

Even if you are telling the truth, it is possible to fail a polygraph test. A polygraph test does not prove whether a person is lying. Rather than revealing the truth, a polygraph measures your physiological responses. An examiner will ask you several questions during the test. A machine then records physiological changes in your body as you respond.
These include changes in:

  • Breathing rates,
  • Pulse,
  • Blood pressure, and
  • Perspiration.

These tests are designed with the goal:

  • if you tell the truth, you will not exhibit changes in these conditions, but
  • If you lie, you will show changes.

Please note, these tests can cause you to feel a great deal of stress. This is especially true if the interviewer asks you questions about:

  • a particular crime, or
  • an event at work.

This stress, combined with other factors in your life, can lead to unwanted fluctuations in physiological conditions. Fluctuating emotions can make it difficult to determine whether a person is telling the truth or lying.

Can I Do A Private Polygraph To Prove I Am Innocent?

You can take a private lie-detector test to prove your innocence. A private polygraph test is when a person administers the lie detector test, who’s not affiliated with any law enforcement agency.</span >
In criminal trials, the test is given to defendants and witnesses. The tests are considered “private” because their results and the fact can be kept confidential. The examiner asks you whether or not you committed the crime. If it is determined that you are telling the truth on a polygraph test, the results may be used in court to help get your case dismissed. If the polygraph indicates you are being untruthful, then your results will be kept secret. The tests are used in all criminal cases involving misdemeanors or felonies. You may be well advised to take a private polygraph in three situations.

You are trying to dismiss a charge during the pretrial process.

  • persuade a prosecutor to agree to use a second test at trial, and
  • convince you to enter into a plea bargain, or plead no contest.

Lie detector tests are administered for a fee by trained polygraph examiners. The typical cost is between $200 and $2,000.

Los Angeles Criminal Defense Attorney Can Help

Although lie detector tests are unreliable and have no legal standing, law enforcement agencies continue to use them because they give investigators an advantage in interrogating suspects. while your rights suffer. There are many things that can cause a test result to be inaccurate. Therefore, you should never agree to take a polygraph test if you are being investigated or think that you may be suspected of committing a crime. Even if you know that you are innocent and pass the polygraph test, police can still find incriminating or embarrassing information about you. They may think you “passed” the test and continue their investigation. Instead of answering questions from the police, you should remain silent and contact a Los Angeles criminal defense lawyer.

At Tabibnia Law, we know the tactics used against the accused and have built our reputation on our ability to obtain favorable outcomes in high stakes criminal cases. Call us today for a free case evaluation.

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